3D Printing FilamentsComposites

Royal DSM introduces new carbon fiber reinforced filament for industrial 3D printing

The new filament, Novamid ID1030 CF10, contains a carbon fiber loading of just 10%

Royal DSM, a Dutch multinational specializing in health, nutrition and materials, has launched its newest industrial 3D printing filament: Novamid ID1030 CF10. The new material, a carbon fiber reinforced PA6/66 filament, was developed for applications in the automotive, sports equipment, medical and manufacturing industries.

What sets Royal DSM’s newest material apart from other carbon fiber reinforced filaments on the market is that its carbon fiber content is actually quite low, making it easier to process on desktop 3D printers. Despite only having a carbon fiber loading of about 10%, Novamid ID1030 CF10 can also reportedly produce industrial parts or functional prototypes with properties nearing those of injection molded parts.

Royal DSM carbon fiber reinforced
Royal DSM Vice President of Additive Manufacturing, Hugo da Silva

“FFF technology is growing rapidly, for use in both prototyping and industrial applications,” commented Hugo da Silva, Vice president of Additive Manufacturing at Royal DSM. “With high-performance materials like our new carbon fiber filament, manufacturers can take it into many more applications like functional prototyping as well as durable and structural industrial parts for harsh environments.”

Royal DSM adds that it has extensively tested the new filament on a range of open FFF 3D printing systems, including GermanRepRap and the Ultimaker S5, and assures that the filament can easily be printed on desktop FFF machines if they are equipped with a hardened nozzle. The testing also suggested that users could print the carbon fiber filament at the same speeds as unreinforced materials, while benefitting from higher part strength and durability.

In terms of applications, Novamid ID1030 CF10 was developed for printing parts with high strength, toughness, tensile strength and dimensional stability. The material has also demonstrated good warpage resistance. All these properties make it suitable for producing parts for the automotive sector (especially under-the-hood components), for protective sports equipment, for manufacturing jigs and fixtures and for medical prosthetics and braces. The filament also exploits one of the most sought after benefits of carbon fiber: its light weight.

Royal DSM, which has been developing stereolithography materials for over two decades and which now offers a growing range of FFF filaments, will be selling the new Novamid ID1030 CF10 material in both 1.75 and 2.85 mm diameter formats. The filament will be distributed via its partners MCPP, Nexeo3DSolutions and, its most recent distribution partner, FormFutura.

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Tess Boissonneault

Tess Boissonneault moved from her home of Montreal, Canada to the Netherlands in 2014 to pursue a master’s degree in Media Studies at the University of Amsterdam. It was during her time in Amsterdam that she became acquainted with 3D printing technology and began writing for a local additive manufacturing news platform. Now based in France, Tess has over two and a half years experience writing, editing and publishing additive manufacturing content with a particular interest in women working within the industry. She is an avid follower of the ever-evolving AM industry.

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