Additive Mass Production - AMPAutomationProduct Launch

Omegasonics releases updated post-processing chamber

Promises faster AM finishing times, a boon for mass production

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California-based Omegasonics released updated ultrasonic cleaning equipment, which will allow for faster, more precise additive manufacturing. The updated machine cleans plastics like ABS, Polycarbonate, Nylon 12, and PCABS, thus making post-processing easier and more automated. This kind of technology goes toward making AM suitable for mass production.

The difference between Omegasonics’ machine and traditional post-processing technologies is the level of automation. Post-processing is often a manual task and can be labor-intensive. Heated circulation washers are sometimes used to clean the parts, which adds up to 24 hours to the processing time for larger parts.

Omegasonics’ machine can do the job in three hours. Armen Boyajyan, the finishing manager at Stratasys, speaks highly of this time-saving tech:

It used to take a full day to manually remove support material from some 3D parts. Now we just put the parts into the ultrasonic cleaner and do something else while they’re being cleaned. After three hours, we have nice, clean parts.”

The newly updated ultrasonic cleaning technology by Omegasonics further reduces post-processing time by up to 24 hours. The company thus boasts that clients get high-quality printed parts faster.

A part packed into the ultrasonic chamber.
A part packed into the ultrasonic chamber.

Faster, automated post-processing allows industrial or mass manufacturers to reallocate human resources. This savings goes a long way to making AM affordable.

The firm will also be launching several new product offerings in 2021 designed to speed cleaning times and reduce warpage, and a thermal dyeing station for 3D thermoplastic products that reduces dyeing times.

Research 2022
Polymer AM Market Opportunities and Trends

741 unique polymer AM companies individually surveyed and studied. Core polymer AM market generated $4.6 billion...

Adam Strömbergsson

Adam is a legal researcher and writer with a background in law and literature. Born in Montreal, Canada, he has spent the last decade in Ottawa, Canada, where he has worked in legislative affairs, law, and academia. Adam specializes in his pursuits, most recently in additive manufacturing. He is particularly interested in the coming international and national regulation of additive manufacturing. His past projects include a history of his alma mater, the University of Ottawa. He has also specialized in equity law and its relationship to judicial review. Adam’s current interest in additive manufacturing pairs with his knowledge of historical developments in higher education, copyright and intellectual property protections.

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