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Impossible Objects and Ricoh 3D partner to bring CBAM technology to Europe

Unique composites AM process and materials target drones, aircraft, automobiles, athletic gear

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A new partnership between 3D printer and materials company Impossible Objects and 3D printing specialist Ricoh 3D will make unique CBAM composites 3D printed parts available to Ricoh 3D’s customers in Europe for the first time.

Impossible Objects’ composite-based additive manufacturing (CBAM) process enables the production of strong parts with reduced costs compared to many other composites AM processes. Composites boast key advantages for 3D printed parts, including superior strength-to-weight ratios, fewer geometric restrictions, superior high-temperature performance, and greater chemical resistance.

Ricoh 3D to bring CBAM technology to Europe

“Composites are set to be an area of huge growth in additive manufacturing in the coming years. These new materials will change the game across a number of industries,” said Mark Dickin, Additive Manufacturing & Molding Engineering Manager at Ricoh 3D. “Impossible Objects’ CBAM process is nothing short of a revolution in the way composites are manufactured, so we are proud to be working with the company to be at the forefront of the European movement.”

3dpbm Research‘s study on Composites AM 2020–2030, which was announced and conducted during Q2 and Q3 2020, surveyed over 50 firms involved in the space, including Impossible Objects, and collected information on sales and business activity from all major companies operating in this segment. 3dpbm Research estimates that the overall composites AM market (materials, hardware, services and applications) will grow from $480 million in 2020 to over $10.6 billion by the end of the forecast period, in 2030.

Composites including Carbon Fiber PEEK and Carbon Fiber PA12 are now available through Ricoh 3D’s AM service bureau immediately.

3D printer hardware releases
The new CBAM-2 composite 3D printed by Impossible Objects

“Our CBAM process represents a significant leap forward in 3D printing, with faster speeds, better material properties and wider material selection,” said Robert Swartz, chairman and founder of Impossible Objects. “Fortune 100 companies, government agencies, and more have already put it to work to create everything from car and aircraft parts to athletic gear. By collaborating with the team at Ricoh 3D who recognizes the transformative potential of additive manufacturing, together we will bring these competitive advantages to more organizations across Europe.”

Impossible Objects’ proprietary CBAM technology can produce parts up to ten times faster than conventional fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing. By combining high-performance polymers like Nylon and PEEK with carbon fiber and fiberglass sheets, parts printed with Impossible Objects machines are stronger, lighter, have better dimensional accuracy, and have better temperature performance than what’s possible with conventional 3D printing methods. The CBAM process can create strong and resilient fine or flat parts, which is important for applications like drones; these have been impossible with FDM and FFF technologies due to the short, chopped fiber formation and lamination between layers, which cause parts to fall apart under force.

Ricoh 3D is the latest industry partner to join forces with Impossible Objects to drive additive manufacturing forward. Other collaborators include chemical giant BASF and TIGER Coatings.

Research 2021
Ceramic AM Market Opportunities and Trends

This market study from 3dpbm Research provides an in-depth analysis and forecast of the ceramic additive ma...

Davide Sher

Since 2002, Davide has built up extensive experience as a technology journalist, market analyst and consultant for the additive manufacturing industry. Born in Milan, Italy, he spent 12 years in the United States, where he completed his studies at SUNY USB. As a journalist covering the tech and videogame industry for over 10 years, he began covering the AM industry in 2013, first as an international journalist and subsequently as a market analyst, focusing on the additive manufacturing industry and relative vertical markets. In 2016 he co-founded London-based 3dpbm. Today the company publishes the leading news and insights websites 3D Printing Media Network and Replicatore, as well as 3D Printing Business Directory, the largest global directory of companies in the additive manufacturing industry.

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