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HP celebrates over 10 million 3D printed parts in one year

The company has also launched its Metal Jet Production Service

As we gradually advance towards the end of 3D printed “firsts” (don’t worry, there are still many to come!), other milestones will begin to mark the staying power of the technology in industrial sectors. HP, for instance, announced this week that its Multi Jet Fusion platform has been used to 3D print more than 10 million parts over the past year.

HP’s MJF technology, which disrupted the 3D printing industry at its release because of its cost and speed, quickly became a go-to AM technology for producing functional prototypes and even end-use products across a broad range of segments. Understandably, the feat of 3D printing over 10 million parts in a year on a still relatively new technology is cause for the printing mogul to celebrate.

10 million parts HP milestone
HP Jet Fusion 500/300 Series

Christoph Schell, President of 3D Printing and Digital Manufacturing, HP Inc., commented:  “More than 10 million parts were produced on HP’s Multi Jet Fusion technology in the last year. We are seeing an explosion of new applications across industries taking advantage of the design freedom, superior economics, speed, and industrial-grade quality unlocked by HP and its partners.

“As we continue to expand our plastics and metals portfolio across both prototyping and production, and build out our community of global partners, we are helping customers save money, accelerate time to market, and improve sustainability as they progress on their digital manufacturing journey.”

At AMUG next week, HP will be showcasing the proliferation of its MJF platform by highlighting new customers and applications, including Fast Radius, a provider of AM solutions that works with high profile customers such as Swedish power product manufacturer Husqvarna Group, Yanfeng Global Automotive Interiors, the United States Marine Corps and HP itself.

“The benefits of the HP Multi Jet Fusion-enabled production service offered by Fast Radius provides customers with enormous application design, production, and supply chain benefits,” said Lou Rassey, CEO, Fast Radius. “From reduced warehousing and obsolescence, and a lower carbon footprint, our collaboration with HP is truly bringing out the real value of additive manufacturing for businesses around the world.” 

HP is also eager to highlight its partners in the automotive sector, such as BMW and Volkswagen. More recently, the company has made inroads in the American automotive market, teaming up with Detroit-area Advantage Engineering Inc. and Linear AMS.

The newer HP Jet Fusion 500/300 Series 3D printers have also begun shipping in volume to a number of innovative clients that are using the 3D printing tech to different ends. Daimler Trucks North America (DTNA), for instance, is leveraging HP’s Jet Fusion 3D printing to speed up its prototyping process. Unlimited Tomorrow, for its part, uses the technology to 3D print custom prosthetics. On the academic front, Clemson University has adopted HP’s Jet Fusion 500/300 Series to reinvent its prototyping and production processes.

10 million parts HP milestone
HP Metal Jet Factory

Finally, HP is also announcing that its new Metal Jet Production Service is now up and running, enabling customers to order end-use metal parts 3D printed on the HP Metal Jet 3D printer. As the 3D printer is not quite commercially ready, HP is keeping the metal production in house (so to speak: GKN Powder Metallurgy and Parmatech will take care of production). Still, customers are invited to upload their 3D models and order industrial-grade 3D printed metal components.

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Tess Boissonneault

Tess Boissonneault moved from her home of Montreal, Canada to the Netherlands in 2014 to pursue a master’s degree in Media Studies at the University of Amsterdam. It was during her time in Amsterdam that she became acquainted with 3D printing technology and began writing for a local additive manufacturing news platform. Now based in France, Tess has over two and a half years experience writing, editing and publishing additive manufacturing content with a particular interest in women working within the industry. She is an avid follower of the ever-evolving AM industry.

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