Home / Construction 3D Printing / First 3D Printed Starbucks Coffee Bar Opens in Shanghai

First 3D Printed Starbucks Coffee Bar Opens in Shanghai

Cement-based construction 3D printing is finding commercial applications in more and more segments. After bridges and houses, it is now time for a 3D printed bar, inside Shanghai’s newest and gigantic Starbuck’s Coffee. This is the first non-US roastery concept store and also the world’s largest Starbucks, not to mention the first (particularly) 3D printed Starbucks in the world.

It includes three coffee bars, one of which clocks in at 88 feet and two of which are 3D printed in concrete (one of these is dedicated to tea beverages). The bar also leverages several other advanced 3D technologies – including augmented reality – to offer clients a fully immersive coffee experience. It is not yet known if additional food 3D printers will be introduced to produce sweets on demand or even functional coffee makers.

Brewing the Benefits of a 3D Printed Starbucks

Coupled with a wooden finish, the 3D printed structures required less time and cost to build, using recycled concrete materials. More and more companies in China – and all over the world – are offering construction 3D printing services, including China-based, market leading Winsun. The benefits from using 3D printing to build simple – and particularly intricate – structures are evident, prompting several larger companies operating in the cement and construction industry to invest heavily in further developing technologies, materials and applications.

Starbucks has already announced the opening of a new and even larger store in the US, 3D printing could probably lend a hand there too, as local companies like Branch Technology and Contour Crafting Corporation are also making a very strong case for directly 3D printed buildings and structures.

 

3D Printing Business Directory

About Victor Anusci

Victor was born in Alexandria, Egypt where he attended school and began working as a professional photographer. He moved to Paris, France, in 1998, where he began working with 3D technologies including photogrammetry and later on 3D scanning and 3D mapping. He developed a passion for 3D printing as a mean to give a physical form to his creations.

Check Also

Reuters, first BatiPrint3D 3D printed public housing unveiled in France  

Share132 Tweet Share9 Buffer9 EmailShares 150 To further validate the efficiency of robotic 3D printing …