3D Printer HardwareProduct Launch

Airwolf 3D’s new EVO 22 3D prints parts over 55 cm tall

New large-format 3D printer by Airwolf 3D is compatible with over 40 materials

Sometimes bigger is better—at least that what California-based 3D printer manufacturer Airwolf 3D would have us believe. The company has just released its latest product, the EVO 22 Additive Manufacturing Center, a machine that boasts a significantly larger build volume than its flagship EVO 3D printer.

With a 22.75 inch (~578 mm) build height, Airwolf 3D’s new EVO 22 is larger than your average desktop machine. But it’s not just its size that sets it apart from competing systems, as Airwolf 3D emphasizes the machine’s overall print quality and compatibility with industrial-grade materials, including polycarbonate, ABS and more.

EVO 22

“We’re often asked what makes our machines different,” commented Airwolf 3D Co-Founder and CEO Erick Wolf. “All you really have to do is look at the type and quality of parts the EVO 22 is capable of manufacturing—large, real-scale parts that not only display beautiful print quality, but also exhibit the strength and mechanical properties required for functional prototypes and production-ready parts.

“Other machines in this price class simply don’t offer the same level of performance and quality, whether it is because their beds and hot ends fail to reach and sustain the temperatures required for pure, engineering-grade filament or they cut corners and use flimsy construction that, again, can not support advanced industrial desktop manufacturing.”

Evo 22

The new EVO 22 is based on the same underlying technology as its predecessor, the EVO, first introduced at CES 2018. For instance, both machines share the same cartridge-style planetary extruder assembly and a three-bolt-reinforced QuickChange hot end, which enables fast and precise material extrusion. The EVO 22 owes its increased build capacity—of 3,276 cubic inches—to Airwolf’s proprietary Tri-Heat Build Environment technology.

Turn up the heat

The Tri-Heat Build Environment consists of three heat sources: two built-in chamber heaters and a high-temperature print bed rated for 160°C. Together, these three heat sources provide a more even and controlled ambient temperature in the printer, which is conducive to better quality prints and is beneficial for large-scale parts.

As the company states: “Combined with a patent-pending hot end and enclosed chamber design, the TriHeat technology optimizes and regulates the heat needed to increase part strength while minimizing cracks and warpage.”

Other features

The new EVO 22 also integrates Airwolf 3D’s proprietary firmware, which operates on the GENESIS board, a custom 32-bit automotive-grade microcontroller. This feature enables higher print speeds, better precision and control, even at “ultra-high temperatures.”

The 3D printer also comes with a HEPA and carbon air filtration system, a patent-pending unitized frame made from 100% aluminum, a stainless steel bed frame, ball screw Z stage and a linear-guide-based CoreXY motion system.

EVO 22

Notably, the EVO 22 machine is also compatible with Airwolf 3D’s patent-pending HydroFill Water-Soluble Support material (as well as over 40 other 3D printing materials). Users can easily work with the support material thanks to the machine’s Dual High-Flow AX2 Extrusion Heads. The machine’s full build volume is 12 x 12 x 22.75 inches (305 x 305 x 578 mm).

“When we designed the original EVO machine, we went to great lengths to optimize and future-proof the technology,” added Wolf. “From the dual planetary extruder system and game-changing internal chamber heaters to the ultra-ruggedized frame and bed construction, the EVO was built to perform. Expanding the build volume of the machine was a natural progression for us, and the EVO 22 offers the ultimate in industrial large part production with the ease of a desktop form factor.”

The new large-format EVO 22 3D printer is now available to order for $11,995 through Airwolf 3D or its authorized resellers. The machine is expected to ship starting this September.

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Tess Boissonneault

Tess Boissonneault moved from her home of Montreal, Canada to the Netherlands in 2014 to pursue a master’s degree in Media Studies at the University of Amsterdam. It was during her time in Amsterdam that she became acquainted with 3D printing technology and began writing for a local additive manufacturing news platform. Now based in France, Tess has over two and a half years experience writing, editing and publishing additive manufacturing content with a particular interest in women working within the industry. She is an avid follower of the ever-evolving AM industry.

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