DefenseIndustrial Additive Manufacturing

SPEE3D metal 3D printing technology to be deployed by the Australian Army

Aussie armed forces can't get enough additive manufacturing

The Australian Army has kicked off a 12-month pilot trial of the new technology in partnership with SPEE3D and Charles Darwin University (CDU). The $1.5 million venture recently announced by the Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Melissa Price MP, will see 20 Darwin-based soldiers trained in advanced additive manufacturing. Last November the Royal Australian Navy announced a similar initiative.

The soldiers, who are mostly drawn from the 1st Combat Service Support Battalion (1 CSSB), will be taught how to design and print parts using the WarpSPEE3D 3D metal printer. The trial represents the realization of a 1 CSSB proposal to the Army in 2019, to modernize and enhance the resilience of the ADF’s supply chains.

Commanding Officer 1 CSSB, Lieutenant Colonel Kane Wright, said that the initiative demonstrates how the Army is keeping up with the accelerated nature of warfare. “This partnership with CDU and SPEE3D shows that we as an army are looking to the future and embracing advanced technologies to speed up our processes,” Lieutenant Colonel Wright said. “At maturity we see it becoming an essential enabler that will redefine how logistics is employed to support our dependencies on the future battlefield.”

Australian Army

Lieutenant Colonel Wright explained that the printer harnesses the power of kinetic energy to fabricate parts in a safe and environmentally friendly manner, allowing 3D metal printing in the field. “This will reduce the requirement to deploy with bulky holdings of multiple repair parts, hence increasing mobility and survivability and reducing time waiting for new parts to create greater resilience in the supply chain,” he said.

The initial training will be delivered at CDU’s Casuarina Campus by experienced researchers over a 10-week period. Weekly sessions will cover everything from the fundamentals of design, 3D modeling, and printing, to the testing and evaluation of developed parts.

Australian Army

Lieutenant Colonel Wright said that the Army will begin by trialing the production of non-safety critical repair parts while leaning on the industry experts to explore the full potential of the capability. CDU Vice-Chancellor and President, Professor Simon Maddocks, visited the soldiers in the classroom.

“This 3D printing technology has the potential to change the way many industries, including Defence, design, manufacture and supply parts,” Vice-Chancellor Maddocks said.

Australian Army

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Davide Sher

Since 2002, I have built up extensive experience as a technology journalist, market analyst and consultant for the additive manufacturing industry. Born in Milan, Italy, I spent 12 years in the United States, where I received my Bachelor of Arts undergraduate degree. As a journalist covering the tech industry - especially the videogame industry - for over 10 years, I began covering the AM industry specifically in 2013, as blogger. In 2016 I co-founded London-based 3D Printing Business Media Ltd. (now 3dpbm) which operates in marketing, editorial, and market analysis & consultancy services for the additive manufacturing industry. 3dpbm publishes 3D Printing Business Directory, the largest global directory of companies related to 3DP, and leading news and insights websites 3D Printing Media Network and Replicatore. I am also a Senior Analyst for leading US-based firm SmarTech Analysis focusing on the additive manufacturing industry and relative vertical markets.

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