AM for SpaceBioprintingCeramics Additive Manufacturing

3D printed ceramic fluid manifolds improve in-space bioprinting

Techshot and Lithoz investigate benefits of ceramic 3D printed fluid manifolds

Over 400 kilometers from Earth, advances are being achieved in the field of bioprinting. In November, the 3D BioFabrication Facility (BFF) was delivered to the International Space Station, where it is being used to test how bioinks and printed human cells react in a microgravity environment. As it turns out, the bioprinter’s output isn’t the only thing being evaluated: the performance of 3D printed ceramic components for bioprinting applications is also being tested.

Aerospace engineering consultancy Techshot, which launched nScrypt’s BFF into space last July, enlisted the help of ceramics 3D printing company Lithoz America to produce a series of 3D printed ceramic fluid manifolds. These components, which were launched into space along with the BFF system, are being tested as part of Techshot’s tissue conditioning system.

Ceramic manifolds in-space bioprinting

According to recent results, the printed ceramic parts are having a positive effect on the bioprinted samples, with December’s yield of biological constructs being significantly larger than July’s.

Lithoz America and Techshot collaborated to develop the ceramic fluid manifolds, which are designed for use inside bioreactors, to determine whether they would be superior to polymer manifolds, which were tested aboard the ISS over the summer. The bioreactors are a critical step in the bioprinting process, as they provide nutrients to the living materials printed in space.

The manifolds, which were printed using an LCM-based CeraFab 3D printer, are now being evaluated based on their biocompatibility, precision, durability and fluid flow dynamics. So far, the results are promising. For instance, the ceramic materials are more biocompatible than the printable polymers.

“It’s been an absolute pleasure working with Lithoz,” said Dr. Carlos Chang, Techshot Senior Scientist. “Their expertise in ceramic procssing really made these parts happen.”

Shawn Allan, Lithoz Vice President, added: “The success of ceramic additive manufacturing depends on working together with design, materials and printing. Design for Ceramic Additive Manufacturing principles were used along with print parameter control to achieve Techshot’s complex fluid-handling design with the confidence needed to use the components on ISS.”

As the in-space research continues, the partners will turn their focus to optimizing the integration of the ceramic fluid manifolds and achieving longer culturing periods for the bio-materials. The conditioned human tissues printed in space are expected to return to Earth early this year. Further evaluation can them be conducted.

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Tess Boissonneault

Tess Boissonneault moved from her home of Montreal, Canada to the Netherlands in 2014 to pursue a master’s degree in Media Studies at the University of Amsterdam. It was during her time in Amsterdam that she became acquainted with 3D printing technology and began writing for a local additive manufacturing news platform. Now based in France, Tess has over two and a half years experience writing, editing and publishing additive manufacturing content with a particular interest in women working within the industry. She is an avid follower of the ever-evolving AM industry.

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